RHEL7 Book review

Share this link

RHCSA 7/RHCE 7 certification books

  • Asghar Ghori‘s RHCSA & RHCE Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (04/2015) covers the RHCSA objectives quite well. Each time, he introduces the subject and covers most of the configuration details with lots of explanations. Except the lack of OpenLDAP/IPA server configuration, making difficult any client side testing, the RHCSA part is well written and pretty exhaustive.
    However, the RHCE part didn’t receive the same attention. Because the topics are pretty new, the quality is lower. If the introduction is still good, some chapters lack real technical material besides a basic tutorial. The IPv6, Kerberos and MariaDB coverages are minimal. The iScsi chapter needs a rewriting. Also, there is no Kerberos KDC/IPA server side configuration. If the RHCSA exam doesn’t require expert level, the RHCE exam does, which is not possible without troubleshooting experience.
    If you are searching for a good book preparing for the RHCSA exam, go for it. But, if you are mainly interested in a RHCE book, there are arguably better options.
  • Sander van Vugt‘s Red Hat RHCE/RHCSA 7 Cert Guide (09/2015) is the first book arguably offering advanced RHCE 7 material. Disclaimer: As I was one of the voluntary proofreaders of this book and spent more than one hundred hours on it, I’m obviously a little biased. Despite the proofreading job done, the first edition of this book displayed a lot of typos. A second edition is now available (03/2016).
  • Michael Jang & Alessandro Orsaria‘s RHCSA/RHCE Red Hat Linux Certification Study Guide 7th edition (03/2016) finally released their book.
    The RHCSA part of the book explains pretty well all the basics with very few typos. However, the coverage of the LDAP client configuration is very light with no LDAP server building instructions. Also, a major command to deal with disks, lsblk, is even not mentioned.
    The RHCE part of the book provides a good coverage of the different objectives. Postfix, Samba, iScsi, Apache and MariaDB topics are all discussed in details with a special attention for NFS and Kerberos.
    Globally, the book is a real success and should satisfy most of the readers.
    Because perfection doesn’t exist, there is still a minor drawback: only the RHEL 7.0 version is presented; all changes appearing in minor versions after it (nmcli syntax, NFS configuration, etc) are not discussed. That’s fine, because until now the RHCSA & RHCE exams currently use the RHEL 7.0 version. When that changes, ask for a book update.

Other books on RHEL 7

  • Andrew Mallett‘s Learning RHEL Networking could almost belong to the RHCSA & RHCE 7 guides if some topics of the curriculum were not missing like the procedure to change the password at boot or some networking subjects like bonding, teaming or routing, something incredible for a book with this name. However, don’t get me wrong, Andrew Mallett, also known as The Urban Penguin, is a very knowledgeable author: this means that you always learn something from one of his books. Here, the book is geared towards beginners and Windows administrators. For beginners, it offers a large panel of subjects (sudoNetworkManager, DNS, DHCP, NTP, iSCSI, LVM, NFS+autofs, Apache, Postfix, SELinux, Firewalld, Samba, Kerberos client) with BtrFS configuration as a bonus. For Windows administrators, it provides a deep dive into Windows Active Directory integration. If one of the previously mentioned topics interests you,the book will bring you clear and progressive explanations.
  • Jonathan Hobson‘s Troubleshooting CentOS is a very interesting book but it can’t compete in the RHCSA 7/RHCE 7 book category: this book teaches you how to troubleshoot services but not how to configure them.
    Unfortunately, there are some important oversights: no mention of  nmap; nothing about yum history undo last; Journald, one of the features brought by Systemd to improve system monitoring from early boot to final shutdown, doesn’t receive any attention!
    Also, choices made in the book are sometimes difficult to understand: good coverage of Xfs troubleshooting but nothing about Ext4! Good explanation about moving a user from one group to another but nothing about the ability for a user to get an additional group!
    However, besides these little imperfections, this book is full of useful tips that every system administrator should know to get his job done and explores rarely discussed topics (rpmdb recovery, MariaDB password recovery, Tripwire installation, Auditd, etc) successfully.
  • Thibault Bartolone‘s Red Hat Enterprise Linux – CentOS (in French) is an excellent introduction to the Red Hat world. The first edition of the book covered RHEL 6. The second edition has recently been updated with good RHEL 7 material.
    If you are new to RHEL or CentOS, this book will help you understand many topics and will provide you the right fundamentals.
  • William LeemansRed Hat Enterprise Linux Server Cookbook is an interesting book geared towards seasoned system administrators searching for production deployment solutions in the RHEL 7 environment. The author provides relevant recipes coming from his real expertise in KVM, Kickstart, Ansible and Puppet. He also explores the performance management domain with a chapter on PCP (Performance Co-Pilot). Many other recipes covering production subjects are also addressed like the deployment with PXE, the network configuration of servers, SELinux, or the management of Yum repositories. However, the chapters about Systemd or Firewalld are less convincing. If deployment of RHEL 7 production servers is the core of your job, this book will definitively help you.
  • Humble Devassy Chirammal, Prasad Mukhedkar, Anil Vettathu’s Mastering KVM Virtualization is the first book in English really discussing KVM in detail. Before, you could find some information on Internet (libvirt.org, wiki.qemu.org, etc), through one chapter or several pages of a book but it was always pretty limited. Here, the authors, all working for Red Hat, explore the theory behind the virtualization and present some KVM internals. Then, they address many facets like network, storage, live migration and snapshot, giving many examples on each topic. They delve into OpenvSwitch, showing the advantages over the basic Linux bridge. Finally, they introduce oVirt, discuss OpenStack deployment, performance tuning and best practices.
    If you really want to get a good understanding of KVM, you need this book.

Disclaimer

This page and only this page contains some “affiliate links”. These links provide me with some compensation if you click on them and then purchase there.
I will always offer my own, truthful opinions and won’t take any compensation in exchange for publishing an opinion.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (4 votes, average: 3.25 out of 5)
Loading...

Leave a Reply

27 Comments on "RHEL7 Book review"

Notify of
Sort by:   newest | oldest
ansuya
Member
ansuya

Hello,
I just bought this one:
Rhcsa & Rhce Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7: Training and Exam Preparation Guide (Ex200 and Ex300), Third Edition 27 mars 2015
by Asghar Ghori
Is it complet and sufficient for preparation of exam RHCE?

lucac81
Member
lucac81

Hi,
I bought the previous edition of Ghori’s book last year to attend RHCSA, but due to lack of time I wasn’t able to book the exam.
Now that RHEL7 and new edition of the book are out, do you think that I have to buy the new edition for RHCSA or I can use the old edition and integrate with other resources specific for RHEL7 (are there RHEL7 only questions in RHCSA?)

Dave
Member
Dave

Hi,
I bought Ghori’s book on the latest version of RHEL to prepare for the RHCSA exam, and I passed it. I am now reading it for RHCE. I am following the exercises and labs. I am on chapter 19 and so far I do not seem to have any issues. I visited his website for errata and noticed he posted procedures on OpenLDAP and Kerberos server configuration to test the client settings provided in the book. I am shooting for the CE exam next month.

Tx
Dave

Dave
Member
Dave

Hello,

I’d like to share the good news that I passed the RHCE exam last week. Asghar Ghori’s book had been really very helpful. The instructions are great and easy to comprehend. The author had been very responsive. I got answers to my questions within a day.

Tx
Dave

tom
Member
tom

I have both Asghar and Sander book. I passed RHCSA by learning Asghar’s book and now I am preparing for RHCE and I am using both books.

Unfortunately I have to say that both of them have mistakes. And actually Sander’s book have quite a lot of them. Also some of Sander’s advises and claims are really doubtful and even wrong. So you have to be very careful when studying from these books. Don’t trust everything what is written there and check yourself!

tom
Member
tom
Hi Sorry, I did not want to blame anyone. I have only read first 4 chapters from RHCE part. I think doubtful is Sander’s advice to use sssd instead of nslcd. In real world surely sssd is preferred, but not in exam. There are several issues with sssd: when you install it, sssd.conf file is not present, you have to create it manually or copy from examples. Sssd will not start if not correct permissions are set. Even when you set correct permissions it will not start if you don’t configure at least one identity provider domain. Then you need… Read more »
Tashir
Member
Tashir

Hi,
I was wondering if I had to go with just one book for RHCSA then which one would be best? As I can see the poll suggest Van Vugt’s book whereas this article kind of suggest Ghori’s book. That made me confuse on which book to get? I am trying to give RHEL7 RHCSA exam. So, for the sole purpose of RHCSA only which one should be better?

Thanks.

Tashir
Member
Tashir

Hi guys,

How legit is this book? They even guarantee return of money 😀
http://www.passleader.com/ex200.html

mikayp
Member
mikayp
I’m working on RHCSA at the moment and have been using Ghori’s book. I have to say I really don’t rate it. There are plenty of mistakes and I find in areas it’s more focussed on telling you what to do than explaining how something works. There are other areas where I found it very hard going to just read it. This site (and a few others) has saved my ass on a few of these topics. I hope I’m right in thinking the book covers the general areas of the exam so you know what you need to learn… Read more »
number 6
Member
number 6

Bought Michael Jang’s book from your link, thanks again for being the best RH cert site!

sairamkrishna9
Member
sairamkrishna9

I am very thank full for this article. Can you please post the link for Sander van Vugt‘s Red Hat RHCE/RHCSA 7 Cert Guide 2nd Edition, So that i can buy it. Can you also give us an review about the second edition ? Is it revised and has less typos ?
Thank You.
Sai

tsabi
Member
tsabi

I also found no trace of the 2nd edition.
Not even on van Vugt’s home page.
Any hint about where to find it?
Thanks

raminderbajwa
Member
raminderbajwa

Hi, Just now got the e-mail from RedHat saying I passed RHCSA-7.
I followed Sander Van Vugt’s book. And will start preparing for RHCE following the same book again!
BTW: Between the time I started preparation and took the exam was 11days only. =:)
Yes I’m an experienced SA with past experience. But let me tell you…RHEL-7 is a new beast. And it seems I tamed it!
(Pat at my back)….lol

wpDiscuz

RHCSA7: Task of the day

Allowed time: 5 minutes.
Add 100MB of swap space to the machine using a new logical volume.

RHCE7: Task of the day

Allowed time: 10 minutes.
Set up a NFS server that exports the /opt directory in read-only mode.

Poll for favorite RHEL 7 book

What is your favorite RHEL 7 book to prepare RHCSA & RHCE exams?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Poll for most difficult RHCSA 7 topic

What do you think is the most difficult RHCSA 7 topic?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Poll for most difficult RHCE 7 topic

What do you think is the most difficult RHCE 7 topic?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Recent Comments